(Ars): “Completely Implausible”—A Controversial Paper Exists, But So Do Black Holes

(Ars): “Completely Implausible”—A Controversial Paper Exists, But So Do Black Holes
"The headlines are reporting on a recent paper submitted to arXiv, which has not, as of this writing, emerged from peer-review, although it builds on the author’s earlier work which has. The paper’s primary author, Laura Mersini-Houghton, a theoretical physicist at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, claims her work proves that black holes cannot form in the first place. "I'm still not over the shock," she said in a written statement issued by the university. "We've been studying this problem for more than 50 years and this solution gives us a lot to think about.""

(Ars): Telescope Tech Lets Us Look Directly at New Worlds

(Ars): Telescope Tech Lets Us Look Directly at New Worlds
""There are now, depending on how confirmed you want a planet to be, up to over 1,000 confirmed planets," Stanford's Bruce Macintosh told an audience at the recent meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. That's in part because of the ease of the transit method of exoplanet detection, which watches for changes in light as the planets pass between their host star and us. "With a sufficient camera, you can do this with a tiny telescope," Macintosh said, pointing to the HATNet system of 11cm telescopes."

(Gizmodo): The Clearest Aerial Shots Of The Himalayas, Ever

(Gizmodo): The Clearest Aerial Shots Of The Himalayas, Ever
"Equipped with the most-advanced gyro stabilized camera in the world, the team at Teton Gravity Research flew from Kathmandu to Mount Everest, capturing the first ultra HD footage ever shot above 20,000 feet. I've never seen these mountains look so beautiful."

(Ars): Heavy Metal Rain May Explain Earth-Moon Differences

(Ars): Heavy Metal Rain May Explain Earth-Moon Differences

"New experiments show that the asteroids that slammed into Earth and the Moon more than four billion years ago were vaporized into a mist of iron. The findings, published in Nature Geoscience, suggest that the iron mist thrown up by these high velocity impacts was fast enough to escape the Moon’s gravity, but stayed gravitationally stuck on the more massive Earth. And these results may help explain why the chemistry of the Earth and the Moon differ."

(Slate): Rosetta Sees Its Shadow on a Comet

(Slate): Rosetta Sees Its Shadow on a Comet
"At one point in the low pass, the Sun was directly behind Rosetta, so its shadow was cast on the surface. The spacecraft itself is a boxy shape roughly two meters on a side, but has solar panels that extend 16 meters across, which is why the shadow is rectangular. It’s fuzzy because the Sun isn’t a point source—if you were on the comet looking up at Rosetta, it would only be blocking part of the Sun, so the shadow isn’t as deep where the Sun isn’t completely blocked. The same thing happens with eclipses here on Earth."

(io9): No, It's Not Illegal To "Spock" Your Fives In Canada

(io9): No, It's Not Illegal To "Spock" Your Fives In Canada
"In the wake of Leonard Nimoy's death, a number of Canadians have taken to the practice ofconverting the portrait of Prime Minister Sir Wilfred Laurier on the Canadian $5 bill into the iconic image of Mr. Spock. According to the Bank of Canada, defacing bills is not illegal — but it's not without consequences."

(SkyNews): --UPDATED-- Harrison Ford Confirmed For Blade Runner Return

(SkyNews): --UPDATED-- Harrison Ford Confirmed For Blade Runner Return
"Harrison Ford is to return as Rick Deckard in a sequel to Ridley Scott's dystopian 1982 Blade Runner classic.
The star's role was confirmed by Alcon Entertainment who said Scott will serve as an executive producer on the project."

(SiberianTimes): Dozens of New Craters Suspected in Northern Russia

(SiberianTimes): Dozens of New Craters Suspected in Northern Russia
"Until now, only three large craters were known about in northern Russia with several scientific sources speculating last year that heating from above the surface due to unusually warm climatic conditions, and from below, due to geological fault lines, led to a huge release of gas hydrates, so causing the formation of these craters in Arctic regions.

(io9): These Tiny Satellites Just Left The International Space Station

(io9): These Tiny Satellites Just Left The International Space Station
"A pair of nanosatellites were deployed by the NanoRacks Launcher on the end of the Japanese robotic arm of the International Space Station on Friday. The tiny CubeSats are loaded with tools to observe the planet."

(ToyBox): Holy Crap, This Lego TARDIS Console Room Is Magnificent

(ToyBox): Holy Crap, This Lego TARDIS Console Room Is Magnificent
"Germany-based Bonsch, who goes by Xenomurphy online, actually started the build back in 2012, planning to finish it in time to celebrate the show's 50 year anniversary in 2013. But building such an impressive model took its toll, and just over 3 years later, he's finally finished it. I'd say it's about time, but that's pretty relative when it comes to all things Time Lord."

(Gizmodo): The Photography at CERN Is Helping Solve the Mysteries of the Universe

(Gizmodo): The Photography at CERN Is Helping Solve the Mysteries of the Universe
"Everyone's favorite mega-machine, the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, is meant to help humans some of the most basic questions about the nature of our world. How it goes about this is—in a word—complex. But part of it involves a bit of good old-fashioned (kind of) photography."

(io9): This Is The Best 3D View Of Deep Space Ever Seen

(io9): This Is The Best 3D View Of Deep Space Ever Seen
"The picture comes from the European Southern Observatory's ultra-powerful and very aptly-named Very Large Telescope. It took over 27 hours for the telescope's MUSE instrument to snap the photo. But it was time well-spent — according to ESO they can now see at least 2o objects that were previously unseen even by Hubble's exceptionally powerful eye, plus get a better idea of how some previously-known galaxies are situated."

(PC): Google Reveals Plans for Futuristic, Flexible Headquarters

(PC): Google Reveals Plans for Futuristic, Flexible Headquarters
"But instead of just constructing more concrete buildings or towering skyscrapers to accommodate a ballooning workforce, Google wants to "create lightweight block-like structures which can be moved around easily as we invest in new product areas," David Radcliffe, vice president of real estate, said in a blog post."

(io9): Dark Energy Camera Takes Accidental, Magnificent Photo of Comet Lovejoy

(io9): Dark Energy Camera Takes Accidental, Magnificent Photo of Comet Lovejoy
"In a happy accident, Comet Lovejoy just happened to be in the field of view of the 570-megapixel Dark Energy Camera, the world's most powerful digital camera. One member of the observing team said it was a "shock" to see Comet Lovejoy pop up on the display in the control room."

(VB): Lenovo Vows to Go 'Bloatware' Free After 'Superfish' Scandal

(VB): Lenovo Vows to Go 'Bloatware' Free After 'Superfish' Scandal
"Fresh from the Superfish scandal that saw some of its PCs subjected to horrible pre-loaded software that compromised user security, Lenovo is trying to win brownie points by vowing to “significantly reduce” its preloaded software, commonly known as “bloatware.”"

(AI): Tim Cook Says Apple Watch Will Replace Electronic Car Keys, Confirms Apple Store Revamp

(AI): Tim Cook Says Apple Watch Will Replace Electronic Car Keys, Confirms Apple Store Revamp
"Cook's automotive revelation came during an interview with the Telegraph in London, where the Apple chief stopped en route back to Cupertino. He had been in Germany and Israel, inaugurating the company's new research and development center in Herzliya."

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